Goodbye Doesn’t Mean Forever

I’ve spent a lot of time with Rachel O’Brien, the protagonist in Up She Rises, but it’s time to say good-bye, although maybe not forever. The manuscript has been submitted to literary agents. I can either keep pressing refresh to check for non-existent emails or I can start working in earnest on novel number two.

Here’s what’s in my writer’s toolbox so far:

  • a working title (too awful to share here)
  • a plot outline
  • the beginnings of writing (fifteen pages of long-hand and five Word pages)
  • a pile of notebooks (I’m considering longhand for the first draft )
  • a nameless main character

Let me tell you a bit about Nameless. She’s a new lawyer from a small town who accepts a position with a big law firm in Toronto. Cue fraud, whistle-blowing and sexual harassment. All in a day’s work, right?

 

I plan to spend today world-building. What about you?

 

 

 

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Goodbye Doesn’t Mean Forever

  1. Leaving behind a manuscript is tough – but you’ll be tougher! And as you write nameless, you may discover insights about Up She Rises. An agent I used to follow (either Noah Lukeman or Nathan Bransford) posted this one day and for the longest time I had it on my bulletin board. “Don’t stop writing because you’ve started querying. Immediately write another book. It will help take your mind off of waiting to hear back from your query submissions, and it will keep you doing what you should be doing–writing. It could take six months to finish the querying process, and by then if you end up with 50 rejections and no agent, you could be upset. But if you’ve been writing all the while, by then you may have a new novel–or at least be far along the path of one–and thus it won’t matter so much if your previous book was rejected. It will also make you that much closer to having another book ready to start the querying process all over again.” Sending best wishes for lots of exciting new writing.

    Like

  2. Pingback: NaNo What Now? – Write It Down-ith

Your turn.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s